“I need therapy. How much of the cost will Medicare pay?”

To most seniors on fixed incomes, that’s the first question that comes to mind.  Thank goodness we live in the Information Age – most of the answers are at the tips of our fingers!

First, find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost:  talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on whether you have other insurance, how much your doctor charges, whether your doctor accepts assignment, the type of therapy provider, and the location where you get your test, item, or service.

Your doctor may recommend you get services more often than Medicare covers. Or, he or she  may recommend services that Medicare doesn’t cover. If this happens, you may have to pay some or all of the costs. It’s important to ask questions so you understand why your doctor is recommending certain services and whether Medicare will pay for them.

Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) helps pay for medically necessary outpatient physical and occupational therapy, and speech-language pathology services.  (The government describes “medically necessary” as “Health Care services needed to prevent, diagnose, or treat an illness, injury, condition, disease or its symptoms and that meet accepted standards of medicine.”)

There are limits on these services when you get them from most providers. These limits are called “therapy caps” or "therapy cap limits."

The therapy cap limits for 2015 are:

  • $1,940 for physical therapy (PT) and speech-language pathology (SLP) services combined;
  • $1,940 for occupational therapy (OT) services.

Everyone with Medicare is covered.  First, though, you must pay the amount of your yearly deductible for Part B.  After that, Medicare will pay its share – 80 percent – of the remaining bill, and you will pay the final 20 percent. The Part B deductible is $147 for 2015.  Medicare will pay its share for therapy services until the total amount paid by both you and Medicare reaches either one of the therapy cap limits.

 (Note that both the United States House and Senate are considering amendments to the Medicare fee schedule.)

You may qualify for an exception to the therapy cap limits so that Medicare will continue to pay its share for your therapy services beyond the therapy cap limits. In this case, your therapy provider must:

  • Establish your need for medically reasonable and necessary services and document this in your medical record; and
  • Indicate on your Medicare claim for services above the therapy cap that your outpatient therapy services are medically reasonable and necessary.

As part of the exceptions process, there are additional limits called “thresholds.”  If you get outpatient therapy services higher than the threshold amounts, a Medicare contractor will review your medical records to check for medical necessity. The threshold amounts for 2015 are: 

  • $3,700 for physical therapy  and speech-language pathology combined; and
  • $3,700 for occupational therapy.

Generally when an exceptions process is in effect, if your therapy provider provides documentation showing that your services were medically reasonable and necessary and indicates this on your claim, Medicare will continue to cover its share above the $1,940 therapy cap limits.

Because Medicare doesn't pay for therapy services that aren't reasonable and necessary, your therapist or therapy provider must give you a written notice, called an Advance Beneficiary Notice of Noncoverage (ABN), before providing generally covered therapy services that aren't medically reasonable and necessary for you at the time. The ABN lets you choose whether you want the therapy services. If you choose to get these services, you agree to pay for them.

To find out of your test, item or service is covered, just go to this page.  It’s the official government site  for Medicare services.  Type in the name of the service you’re considering in the box at the top of the page, and you’ll know right away if it’s a covered procedure.

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist your therapy – we’re the experts!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Blue Sky disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

This information only applies if you have Original Medicare. If you have a Medicare Advantage Plan (like an HMO or PPO), check with your plan for information about your plan’s coverage rules.

More resources:

American Physical Therapy Association

 

We’ll serve you at our Outpatient Center, too!

Blue Sky’s outpatient facility on Mahoning Avenue in Champion Township offers spine therapy, physical therapy, aquatic therapy, muscle-loss prevention and wellness classes. Our licensed professionals are experienced therapists with a great passion for re-educating all ages in order to prevent decline and dysfunction.

Here, we treat individuals with musculoskeletal disorders such as back and neck strains or knee injuries, those who have suffered a work-related injury, post-surgical patients, orthopedic patients, and those with neurological deficits such as stroke patients.

Our goal is to restore strength, range of motion, balance and function.

Physical therapy helps clients build strength, endurance, muscle tone, range of motion, hand-eye coordination and balance while decreasing anxiety and boosting energy levels and mood.

To provide these therapies, Blue Sky Outpatient offers on-site aquatics, resistance training, weight-bearing exercise, balance and coordination exercises and orthotic training.

Following a thorough initial evaluation, an individualized treatment program is developed in collaboration with the patient. Programs include education of the patient's diagnosis and self-management strategies. All patients are instructed in a customized Home Exercise Program.

Our staff can assist you with many issues you may be experiencing, including:

    Neurological conditions (Parkinson’s disease, Multiple Sclerosis, strokes, etc.)
    Orthopedic conditions (pain, sprains and strains, fractures, arthritis, etc.)
    Post-Surgical therapy (total joint replacements, fractures, etc.)
    Balance issues (with or without a history of falls)
    Weakness and re-conditioning (as a result of illness or other medical problems)

A prescription from your doctor is all we need to begin scheduling your sessions with physical therapy. Our team, in conjunction with your doctor, will begin designing an individual care plan and home program that's right for you!

 

Speech therapy – helping you to say what you mean

You had a stroke. Fortunately, you seem to have recovered well.  But you have difficulty in understanding what people around you are saying sometimes, or perhaps you can’t seem to find the words you want to say. Your brain seems to have forgotten how to do these things.

Don’t worry, you’re not alone. As people age, normal changes occur in their speech, language, memory, and swallowing. In addition, their chances of having a stroke or developing dementia or Parkinson's disease increase, as do the chances of acquiring a communication or swallowing disorder related to these diseases.

The speech-language pathologists at Blue Sky Therapy play an important role in working with patients who experience this disorder.  Speech-language pathologists — SLPs — can assist in differentiating between normal aging and disordered communication or swallowing function. They provide vital services to those individuals whose communication, cognitive, or swallowing impairments are due to illness, trauma, or disease.  This is what we call “speech therapy.”

Simply put, speech therapy is simply a method to help people with speech and language problems to speak more clearly. In the case of the elderly, therapy often follows a trauma such as stroke or a fall that affects a patient’s ability to use language.

Speech Therapy focuses on receptive language, or the ability to understand words spoken to you, and expressive language, or the ability to use words to express yourself. It also deals with the mechanics of producing words, such as articulation, pitch, fluency, and volume. 

The professional in charge of your speech therapy — variously called a speech-language pathologist or speech therapist or any combination of these words — will work to find activities to strengthen your areas of weakness. Treatment for the elderly after a stroke can include art therapy, singing, group therapy, associating words with pictures and other techniques to stimulate and promote re-establishing neurological connections within the brain for communication.

Blue Sky’s speech-language pathologists work with people who cannot produce speech sounds or cannot produce them clearly, and with those with language disorders — problems understanding and producing language; and those with cognitive communication impairments, such as attention, memory and problem-solving disorders.

A speech disorder refers to a problem with the actual production of sounds; a language disorder refers to difficulty in understanding or putting words together to communicate ideas.

Speech disorders include:

  • Articulation disorders: difficulties producing sounds in syllables or saying words incorrectly to the point that listeners can't understand what's being said.
  • Fluency disorders: problems such as stuttering, in which the flow of speech is interrupted by abnormal stoppages, repetitions (st-st-stuttering), or prolonging sounds and syllables (ssssstuttering).
  • Resonance or voice disorders: problems with the pitch, volume, or quality of the voice that distract listeners from what's being said. These types of disorders may also cause pain or discomfort for the speaker.
  • Dysphagia/oral feeding disorders: these include difficulties with drooling, eating, and swallowing, such as increased coughing while eating and/or drinking, trouble taking medications, runny nose or watery eyes when eating are all signs and symptoms of a swallowing disorder.

With the speech therapist’s skills, and the patient’s determination to improve, there’s no limit to the improvements that can be seen!

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist your therapy – we’re the experts!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Blue Sky disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Resources

American Speech-Hearing-Language Association

Princeton Review

Redlands College

Healthline

Occupational Therapy: Getting back to the tasks of living

To the uninitiated, physical therapy and occupational therapy may seem to be pretty much the same thing.  So how do you know which one you need after you’ve suffered a health crisis – a fall, perhaps, or a stroke?

Both physical and occupational therapists deal with patients with physical injuries and limitations, but they approach those patients in very different ways.  The difference shows up in how they treat the issues, as well as in what issues those are.

Physical Therapists deal with “the big picture:” the treatment of disease, injury, or deformity by physical methods. They help patients with strength, balance, flexibility – the basics of motion.

Occupational therapists go beyond this. While they, too, deal with the overall issues, they also tend to the finer points of daily life and activities – the “occupation of life,” so to speak. They help clients relearn how to tie their shoes, do up buttons, and manipulate small objects. They can facilitate independence by teaching or re-teaching necessary tasks and skills such as writing, cooking, and even housework.

Both fields focus on the recovery of a functional impairment. The difference may be evident in setting and practice. In the hospital setting, the "occupational functions" that are being recovered include self-care activities such as restoring the ability of the patient to perform bathing, dressing, feeding, etc. Physical therapy will focus on mobility tasks such as getting out of bed, standing, walking etc.

In the outpatient setting, occupational therapists may focus on  "hand therapy,"  as hand injuries are common occupational hazards not only on the job but elsewhere, and on elbow and shoulder therapy.

Clients of occupational therapists may need help in those broader areas that physical therapy covers, as well; some clients of one type of therapist are also clients of the other, as the two go hand in hand in many cases.

Occupational therapy covers much more than physical therapy. Occupational therapists can aid clients in treating developmental and cognitive disorders such as Attention Deficit Disorder (ADD) and learning disabilities; sensory disorders, such as autism; and mental health, including depression, addiction, anxiety and eating disorders.

One of the differences between physical therapists and occupational therapists is the help clients get from an OT with the world around them and the things that affect them in everyday life, not just the limitations caused by their own physical and mental state. An OT can help a client with:

  • Medication management: helping clients keep track of their medications and teaching them about their effects and interactions.
  • Routine and schedules: the OT can help develop an outline for the client to follow, and help them stick to it.
  • Education: an OT can suggest training, groups, and classes tailored to the client’s needs.

Occupational therapy treatments will frequently include manual therapy techniques, stretching, therapeutic exercise, hand strengthening, activities to improve manual dexterity, and caregiver training. Occupational therapists may also recommend appropriate adaptive equipment such as reachers, dressing aids, specialized dishes and utensils, and splints for positioning. Educating patients regarding their condition, accommodations, and proper use of adaptive equipment is an important aspect of occupational therapy. An occupational therapist will also create an individualized home exercise program to encourage a patient’s continued progress.

The PT and OT they will often collaborate to maximize the effectiveness of a session. For example, in a nursing home, the physical therapist may help the patient stand from a wheelchair and maintain standing balance while the occupational therapist assists the patient in hygiene tasks at the sink. At an outpatient clinic, they can work together to help a person resume gardening – the physical therapist would help with walking outdoors on uneven surfaces, using proper body mechanics while lifting and carrying gardening supplies, and practicing squatting; while the occupational therapist would assist with opening packages, using a trowel, and turning on the faucet.

Physical therapy and occupational therapy overlap in some areas, and at times it can be hard to tell which is which. The difference lies in the occupational therapist’s assistance in combining the physical, mental and environmental aspects of the client’s situation to arrive at a plan that will heal as well as re-enable the client to take up the reins in everyday life.  

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist your therapy – we’re the experts!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Blue Sky disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.

Resources:

Holsman Physical Therapy

& Rehabilitation P.C.

Occupational Therapy

Schools Guide

Ortho Hips and Knees- Part 7

The recovery period

In our previous blogs, we’ve talked about the alternatives to hip and knee replacement surgery, and what to expect if you’ve chosen total joint replacement.  In this, our final blog on the subject, we’ll talk about the recovery period. As with the previous columns, our information comes from the American Association of Hip and Knee surgeons; this time, the association’s Dr. Stephen J. Kelly, M.D., answers most frequently asked questions: 

Will I need to stay in the hospital?
On average, patients spend two nights in the hospital following surgery. Some patients may spend as little as one night, others may stay as long as three nights.

What is recovery like in the hospital?

Recovery starts right after surgery. You are helped out of bed on the day of or the day after surgery. A physical therapist will help you to walk, and most patients will have one or two sessions of physical therapy per day. The goal of therapy is to assist with strengthening of the muscles and walking. Therapy will also make sure that you are safe when you go home. That’s important when doing things like dressing, using the bathroom, getting up from a chair, and climbing stairs.

Will I be able to walk after surgery?
Most patients use a walker or crutches after surgery but often will be able to progress rapidly to using a cane. Walking soon after surgery helps you get better. It also helps avoid things like bedsores, pneumonia, and blood clots.

Can I go directly home from the hospital?
Many patients are able to leave the hospital and go directly home after surgery. It is important to identify a family member or friend who will be able to help with common household tasks such as preparing meals and doing dishes. Some patients will require a stay at a specialized care facility such as a nursing home or rehab hospital.

Will I be able climb stairs when I leave the hospital?
In general, patients are able to climb stairs after leaving the hospital; however, it is often initially slow and tiring and most patients are happiest if initially they are able to stay on one floor after returning home from surgery.

Will I need Physical Therapy after surgery?
All patients benefit from specific exercises after surgery. These will be directed by your surgeon and often will involve a physical therapist. Most patients need to do their exercises for a minimum of four to six weeks following surgery.

How much will my joint replacement weigh?
Most weigh between one and two pounds.

Are there any activities I will not be able to participate in after I recover from my joint replacement?
Most patients are advised to avoid running, jumping, or impact sports after surgery, so that your joint replacement may last longer.

Will I be in a lot of pain?

Fear of pain from surgery is one of the biggest reasons why people avoid having a hip or knee replacement. Pain control comes from using several medications that affect both the spinal cord and the brain.  With better pain control, you will have mild to moderate pain. There are also medications that help control nausea if it occurs.

When will I be back to normal?

Most people get better from hip or knee replacement in about six weeks. The time it takes to walk without a cane or drive after surgery is different for everyone. You will need physical therapy after going home. The skin incision or cut will heal in two to three weeks, but the process of healing can take up to a year. Once you are without pain, you will notice an improvement in your ability to walk.

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist you after knee replacement therapy!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

Resources:

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Developed by the AAHKS Patient Education Committee. Authors: Craig J. Della Valle, MD, Frank R. DiMaio, MD, Marc W. Hungerford, MD.

Ortho Hips and Knees- Part 6

When total knee replacement is the only option

If alternative methods such as medications, injections, bracing, weight loss or exercise don’t give you relief, you may consider a total knee replacement – a TKR. These are some of the frequently asked questions regarding total knee replacement:

How long does a TKR last?

As with a total hip replacement, you have a 90-95% chance that your joint will last 10 years, and a 80-85% chance that it will last 20 years. With improvements in technology, these numbers may improve.

What types of implants are there?

Here are specific implant design terms:

Gender specific: a modified implant design that accounts for average anatomic differences between men’s and women’s knees.

Rotating platform: a plastic bearing that independently rotates on a metal tray on which it is seated.

Will I need general anesthesia?

Both hip and knee replacements can be performed under regional anesthesia. Choices for regional anesthesia include spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, or one of a variety of peripheral nerve blocks. Data shows that regional anesthesia can reduce complications and improve your recovery experience with less pain, less nausea, and less narcotic medicine required.

What is minimally invasive surgery?

Minimally invasive surgery is a term that describes a combination of reducing the incision length and lessening tissue disruption beneath the incision.

How long will I stay in the hospital?

You will likely stay in the hospital for one to three days, depending on your rehabilitation protocol and how fast you progress with physical therapy.

When can I walk after surgery, and how long before I can shower?

Most people are walking with the assistance of a walker on the day after surgery, and using a cane or nothing at all by 2-3 weeks. If you have been given a standard dressing, you won’t be allowed to shower for 5-7 days.

How long does it take to recover?

It can take up to three months to return to most activities, and likely six months to a  year to fully recover following a TKR.

Will I need physical therapy, and if so, for how long?

Most people who have undergone TKR require outpatient physical therapy following surgery. A skilled therapist can accelerate the rehabilitation as well as make the process more efficient with the use of dedicated machines and therapeutic modalities. Depending on your condition before surgery, physical therapy is beneficial for up to 3 months and rarely longer. The amount of therapy needed depends upon your condition before surgery, motivation, and general health.

In our next blog, we’ll talk about the recovery period.

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist you after knee replacement therapy!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

Resources:

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Developed by the AAHKS Patient Education Committee. Authors: Craig J. Della Valle, MD, Frank R. DiMaio, MD, Marc W. Hungerford, MD.

Ortho Hips and Knees- Part 5

Surgical Options for Knee Arthritis

As we’ve pointed out in previous blogs, the first line of treatment for knee pain is nearly always non-surgical, even if the pain is significant.  But if alternative methods such as medications, injections, bracing, weight loss or exercise don’t give you relief, you may consider a total knee replacement – a TKR.

If you are considering such a move, you’re bound to have questions.  Here are some of the most common ones, and the answers as provided by the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

Arthroscopy

Arthroscopy involves a surgeon making a small incision in your knee and irrigating and removing loose pieces of cartilage. In the arthritic knee, there is a very limited role for an arthroscopy. Results of a “clean out” or a “wash out” are unpredictable at best and should be avoided.

Partial Knee Replacement – The Unicompartmental Knee

A surgeon performing a partial knee replacement, also known as a “uni,” replaces only the part of the knee that is worn out. This can be either the knee cap-femur joint (patello-femoral) or more commonly the femur-shin joint (femoral-tibial). These procedures are appealing because they are generally less invasive, more normal tissue is retained, and recovery is easier. Outcomes of partial knee replacements can be comparable to total knee replacements ten years after surgery.

Total Knee Replacement

Total Knee Replacement (TKR) is the gold standard when conservative treatment for arthritis of your knee has failed. This procedure involves resecting the ends of the bones of the knee and replacing them with a combination of metal and plastic. This is one of the most successful of all surgical procedures: on average, TKR provides 90-95% pain relief and has only a 1 to 2% complication rate. Approximately 90% of replaced knees will be satisfactory twenty years after surgery.

Osteotomy

This procedure, which involves cutting the bone and reorienting the alignment of the knee, has traditionally been reserved for younger patients with malaligned knees who participate in high-demand activities such as sports. Currently, osteotomy has a limited role in the treatment of osteoarthritis of the knee.

Cartilage Procedure

This procedure involves harvesting cartilage cells and transplanting them into the area of disease in your knee. There is very little role for this procedure in an arthritic knee and it has no role to play in the treatment of the advanced arthritic knee.

In our next blog, we’ll discuss total knee replacement in detail.

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist you!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

Resources:

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Developed by the AAHKS Patient Education Committee. Authors: Craig J. Della Valle, MD, Frank R. DiMaio, MD, Marc W. Hungerford, MD.

Ortho Hips and Knees- Part 4

When total hip replacement is the only option

As we’ve pointed out in previous blogs, the first line of treatment for hip pain is nearly always non-surgical, even if the pain is significant.  But if alternative methods such as medications, injections, bracing, weight loss or exercise don’t give you relief, you may consider a total hip replacement – a THR.

If you are considering such a move, you’re bound to have questions.  Here are some of the most common ones, and the answers as provided by the American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons.

How long does a THR last?

A common reply is that total joint replacement lasts 15-20 years. A more accurate way to think about it is through the annual failure rates: most current data suggests that both hip and knee replacements have an annual failure rate between 0.5-1.0%. This means that if you have your total joint replaced today, you have a 90-95% chance that your joint will last 10 years, and a 80-85% that it will last 20 years. These numbers may improve with improvements to technology.

Are all hip replacement implants the same?

As surgeons and manufacturers determine which designs work best, most implants today have become more similar than different. One variable that still remains is the bearing surface – the  ball and liner that attach to the stem and cup that fix to the bone. The ball can be composed of either metal or ceramic, and the liner can be made of plastic, metal, or ceramic.

My surgeon talks about “approach;” what is he talking about?

The way a surgeon gains access to the hip during hip replacement surgery is referred to as an “approach.” There are several types of approaches: the “posterior approach,” which is done from the back of the hip and is the most common; the “anterior approach,” which is performed from the front of the hip, and the lateral approach, which is less popular.

Will I need general anesthesia?

Not necessarily: both hip and knee replacements can be performed under regional anesthesia such as spinal anesthesia, epidural anesthesia, or one of a variety of peripheral nerve blocks. Regional anesthesia has a high preference rate because data shows it can reduce complications and improve your recovery with less pain, less nausea, and less narcotic medicine required.

What is minimally invasive surgery?

Minimally invasive surgery is a combination of reduced incision length and lessened tissue disruption beneath the incision. This includes cutting less muscle and detaching less tendon from bone.

How big will my scar be, and when will it disappear?

This depends on several factors: the size of the patient, the complexity of the surgery, and surgeon preference, to name a few. The scar will heal within a few weeks, but then will remodel and change appearance over the next one to two years.

How long will I stay in the hospital?

You will likely stay in the hospital for one to three days,  depending on your rehabilitation program and how fast you progress with physical therapy. This is highly dependent upon your condition before surgery, your age, and medical problems that can hinder your rehabilitation.

When will I be able to walk after surgery, and when can I shower?

Most people are walking with the aid of a walker on the day after surgery, and using a cane or nothing at all by 2-3 weeks. Most surgeons do not like the wound to be exposed to water for 5-7 days; however, more surgeons are using waterproof dressings that allow patients to shower the day after surgery. You can remove the dressing at 7-10 days after surgery.

How long does it take to recover?

The majority of people who undergo THA are able to participate in a majority of their daily activities by 6 weeks. By 3 months, most people have regained much the endurance and strength lost around the time of surgery, and can participate in daily activities without restriction.

Will I need physical therapy, and if so, for how long?

Initially, you will receive some physical therapy while in the hospital. Depending on your preoperative conditioning and support, you may or may not need additional therapy as an outpatient. Much of the therapy after hip replacement is walking with general stretching and thigh muscle strengthening, which you can do on your own without the assistance of a physical therapist.

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist you after hip replacement therapy!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

In our next blog, we’ll talk about surgical options for knee arthritis. 

Resources:

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Developed by the AAHKS Patient Education Committee. Authors: Craig J. Della Valle, MD, Frank R. DiMaio, MD, Marc W. Hungerford, MD.

Ortho Hips and Knees- Part 3

Surgical options for hip arthritis

With people living longer than ever, arthritis of the hip and knee is more common. The American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons estimates there may be a need for 500,000 hip replacements and 3,000,000 knee replacements each year by the year 2030.

But joint replacement is the last option.  There are treatments and surgical procedures that may relieve the problem without restoring to knee or hip replacement. In this and succeeding blogs, we’ll discuss your options as recommended by the AAHKS.

First, let’s look at hip arthritis. When non-surgical treatments for hip arthritis fail, you and your doctor may consider surgery. There are several surgical options that are useful for treating osteoarthritis in your hip:

Hip arthroscopy is usually an outpatient procedure to repair torn cartilage and to remove extra bone that occurs in the very earliest stages of osteoarthritis. The surgeon uses small incisions around the hip to allow for insertion of a tiny camera called an arthroscope. Arthroscopy is rare in patients over 40 years of age.

Femoral and acetabular osteotomy surgery involves cutting the bone to reorient your hip joint when your hip has structural abnormalities. This is extensive surgery that involves the insertion of plates and screws to hold the bone in place while it heals. It requires several days of inpatient hospitalization, and recovery usually takes six to twelve weeks.

Hip resurfacing is the use of a metal-on-metal device where the hip ball is capped. It usually requires inpatient hospitalization for several days, and recovery usually takes six to twelve weeks. There are few circumstances where it would be required.

Total hip replacement (THR) is considered the “gold standard” for treating your disabling hip pain. Circumstances that may indicate the necessity of THR occur in people of all ages, sexes, and activity levels.

In our next blog, we’ll discuss Total Hip Replacement in detail.

We at Blue Sky Therapy are ready to assist you!

Blue Sky Therapy has a continued commitment to patient-driven quality, excellence, integrity and innovation in everything that we do. That’s why we are scrupulous about planning the treatment of each and every client, and carefully documenting the outcome!

Resources:

American Association of Hip and Knee Surgeons. Developed by the AAHKS Patient Education Committee. Authors: Craig J. Della Valle, MD, Frank R. DiMaio, MD, Marc W. Hungerford, MD.